The Post

Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” couldn’t have arrived at a better time. Despite being set in the early 1970s, the events in the film are sadly still relatable and relevant today, especially with how leaders in different parts of the world are suppressing freedom of the press. In the Philippines, the Government has revoked the license

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The Cured

Zombie outbreaks do not deter egoism. That’s the hilarious takeaway from David Freyne’s obtusely serious living-dead drama, “The Cured,” where the undead are revived back to their human selves. The hook is that the film’s former-zombies bear, in their return, memories of their rootless flesh-munching. And this, the film doesn’t let it slip by

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The Shape of Water

In my head, the elevator pitch for “The Shape of Water” went like this: a lonely cleaning lady falls in love with an amphibious creature captured in a government research facility. The premise, I imagine, would have earned scoffs for its unusual, almost laughable nature. But placed at the able hands of Guillermo del Toro

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Darkest Hour

If there would be a companion film to Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk”, nothing would be more fitting than Joe Wright’s “Darkest Hour”. Both films cover the same dark period in British history when the country is on the brink of war with the Germans. While Dunkirk takes us on-ground to where the stranded troops are,

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Primal Rage

Like you, the Oh-Mah—or, as it’s more commonly known, Bigfoot—tries to keep itself busy. On a sprightly sunny day, it likes to creep laterally from behind pine trees, growl beastly from afar its prey, and roar triumphantly as it relishes in the many cunning ways it decapitates its victims. Like its cousin, the Oh-Mah

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Black Panther

Coming from a studio that has long been accused of whitewashing characters, Marvel does something right with Ryan Coogler’s “Black Panther”. Not to downplay the fact that we do have a lot of black Marvel superheroes, but with the MCU’s history of casting white actors-verse-Asian (read: Tilda Swinton as The Ancient One in “Doctor

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The Greatest Showman

In “The Greatest Showman,” we’re introduced to a gorgeous silhouette rather than a character. “Ladies and gents, this is the moment you’ve been waiting for,” croons the scarlet-clad titular suavely ring-master, with scant to none the stage jitters that the very best showmen share. That’s due to it that beyond being an adept showman, P.T. Barnum

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Rust

Aly Muritiba’s “Ferrugem” (lit. “Rust”) opens with a haunting shot of a gymnotiform. It rears its head out of the coral, eyes still-white, mouth plopping open and shut, and body coated with a corroded tint of yellow. “They say when it feels threatened,” an unknowing Tatiana (Tifanny Dopke) tells her brooding classmate and eventual

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Maze Runner: The Death Cure

“Maze Runner: The Death Cure” is the most action-packed installment in the franchise, giving us a gripping conclusion to the “Maze Runner” trilogy. Set in a dystopian world plagued by a virus that turns humans into flesh-eating zombies, “The Death Cure” follows Thomas (Dylan O’Brien), among the survivors who are immune to the deadly

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All Of You

Given the success of “English Only Please”, it makes sense to assume a with film Jennylyn Mercado and Derek Ramsay with director Dan Villegas is a recipe for another blockbuster. The 2014 movie was a hit, proving both actors’ on-screen chemistry. But following the same formula became a major pitfall in Villegas’ MMFF 2017

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